Far From Home: The Syrian Trojan Women Project

Far From Home: The Syrian Trojan Women Project

  by Amina Foda What began as a response to the mental health needs of Syrian refugees in Amman, Jordan has grown into a captivating platform for the world to hear the voices of Syrian refugees. The Syria: The Trojan Women project produced a theatrical adaptation of Euripides’ The Trojan Women on the grounds of the everlasting themes and consequences of war that continue today in the Syrian crisis. The play, performed by a group of Syrian refugee women, embodies the women’s journey with mental anxiety, depression and PTSD. It provides a sobering view into their lived experiences and raises awareness of their challenges. In the words of one of the Syrian refugee actresses, the sentiments of loss and the pain of displacement found in Euripides’ play, The Trojan Women, resonated with their experiences of the modern day Syrian crisis. “War is eternal, just the weapons have changed” — UK based producer, Charlotte Eagar, introduced the Project to an auditorium of Columbia University students in New York City (an evening organized by the Columbia Global Mental Health Program and co-hosted by Columbia College). The New York audience was connected to a group of Syrian refugee women in Amman, Jordan who shared their experiences and hopes to a growing Western audience. Originally scheduled to travel to the United States to perform their adaptation of Euripides’ classic anti-war tragedy, visa denials prevented their physical presence in NYC. As a saving grace, technology bridged the political roadblocks to sharing their story. The women were thoughtful and purposeful in their discussion with the audience. They shared their lived-experiences of building their new community...

Social barriers to mental health services in Arab populations

  by Aseel Hamid Accounting for 13% of the total global burden of disease,1 untreated mental health disorders are one of the leading causes of disability, causing lasting disruptions in mood, thinking and daily functioning. It has been predicted that by 2030, depression will be a leading cause of the global burden of disease.2 As outlined in “Access to Mental Health Care in the Middle East”, mental health is not a strong priority in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region and services are not widespread despite efforts made. The lack of prioritization around mental health means that the available resources are rarely translated into policy or planning for action at a population level by governments. The purpose of this entry is to determine which factors lead to underutilization of the few existing mental health services. After all, if governments invest in services and the respective public does not utilize them then it will inevitably lead to further deprioritization: a perpetual cycle.   Where does this cycle begin? It is highly unlikely that underutilization results from a lack of need. Prevalence rates of mental illness in MENA are similar to the prevalence rates worldwide.3 Furthermore, the MENA region has been greatly affected by conflicts, some of which are ongoing such as in Syria, Palestine and Iraq. A recent study found that countries in MENA affected by conflict tend to report a much higher rate of depression,4 and another study carried out in areas affected by conflicts show rates of 17% for post-traumatic stress disorder; 5 this is almost five times the prevalence rate of PTSD found in the...